What is the difference between the Relative Momentum Index (RMI) indicator and the Relative Strength Index (RSI) indicator when overbought and oversold?


What is the difference between the Relative Momentum Index (RMI) indicator and the Relative Strength Index (RSI) indicator when overbought and oversold?
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1/1/2023



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💥The Relative Momentum Index (RMI) and the Relative Strength Index (RSI) are both momentum indicators that are commonly used to analyze financial markets. However, there are some differences between the two indicators when it comes to overbought and oversold conditions.

💥The RSI indicator is typically used to identify overbought and oversold conditions in a market. It oscillates between 0 and 100 and is considered overbought when it reaches 70 or higher, and oversold when it reaches 30 or lower. When the RSI is in overbought territory, it suggests that the market is overextended to the upside and may be due for a correction. Conversely, when the RSI is oversold, it suggests that the market is oversold and may be due for a rebound.

💥On the other hand, the RMI indicator is a more recent innovation that aims to improve on the shortcomings of the RSI. While the RMI also oscillates between 0 and 100, it is designed to be more responsive to changes in market conditions. The RMI uses a different calculation method that incorporates both the positive and negative momentum of price changes, as opposed to the RSI which only considers the magnitude of price changes.

💥When it comes to overbought and oversold conditions, the RMI can be interpreted differently than the RSI. The RMI is considered overbought when it reaches 70 or higher, and oversold when it reaches 30 or lower, just like the RSI. However, the RMI may reach these levels more frequently than the RSI, due to its more responsive nature. Therefore, it may be necessary to adjust the overbought and oversold levels when using the RMI in order to get more accurate signals.

💥Overall, while both the RMI and RSI can be useful for identifying overbought and oversold conditions in the market, the RMI may provide more timely and accurate signals due to its more responsive calculation method. However, traders should still use caution and look at other indicators and factors when making trading decisions.

💥Relative Momentum Index (RMI) One of the disadvantages of the RSI is that the RSI itself is not always evenly distributed between the overbought and oversold areas due to the effect of calculating the parameter and denominator in the formula, which can sometimes skew the distribution of the RSI toward the overbought or overbought areas. Too much oversold in either way, making the signal unsuitable for short-term use. Some people solve this problem by using a moving average as a supplement to send trading signals, some people use a trend line charting technique to supplement.

💥To address this disadvantage, Roger Altman proposed an idea to improve the RSI with one more parameter: instead of measuring today's price change compared to yesterday's gain or loss, it measures the change in price. Today versus 3 days ago, which is a measure of y-day Momentum. Therefore, Altman calls this updated RSI the y Relative Momentum Index (RMI) indicator.

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💥We can also say that the RSI is a special case of the RMI, that is, the RSI is the RMI in case y=1. Since the RSI compares today's price with yesterday's price, the value of the RMI ranges between 0 to 100 and its interpretation or analysis is exactly the same as RSI, but has the advantage that If we choose a good y value for Momentum calculations, it will help the RMI to spread well overbought and oversold ranges and deliver a more accurate signal.




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